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Electrocardiogram interpretation skills in pediatric residents


1 Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, USA
2 Department of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, USA

Correspondence Address:
Michael Crocetti
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Ave, Baltimore, MD 21224
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.64356

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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 3-7

 

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Objective : The primary objective of this study was to evaluate pediatric residents' ability to correctly identify electrocardiogram (ECG) findings and pair them to a corresponding cardiac diagnosis. Methods: Forty-six pediatric residents from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center were surveyed to evaluate their ability to interpret ECGs and factors affecting that ability. Included in the survey was a packet of 10 patient vignettes each accompanied by a 12-lead ECG. The primary outcome variable was the resident's score of correctly paired ECG findings with the appropriate cardiac diagnosis. One point was given for each pair correctly identified for a maximum of 10 points. Simple and multiple linear regression was used to estimate the magnitude and significance of any association between score of correct responses and resident year, completion of a pediatric cardiology rotation, self-rated ability to read ECGs, and training received in reading ECGs. Results : The mean number of correct ECG findings and cardiac diagnosis pairings out of 10 for the PGY 1 group was 4.1 ± 3, PGY 2 group 4.9 ± 2.9, PGY 3 group 6.6 ± 2, and the PGY 4 group 6.8 ± 1.7. In the unadjusted linear regression model, the PGY 3 group correctly identified 2.4 more pairings compared to the PGY 1 group (P =0.02). Those who completed a pediatric cardiology rotation correctly identified 2.5 more pairings compared to those who did not complete a rotation (P=0.001). Conclusions: ECG interpretation significantly improved from PGY 1 to PGY 3. Educational programs involving ECG interpretation should target those diagnoses with high clinical severity and average to poor resident knowledge.






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1 Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, USA
2 Department of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, USA

Correspondence Address:
Michael Crocetti
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Ave, Baltimore, MD 21224
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.64356

Rights and Permissions

Objective : The primary objective of this study was to evaluate pediatric residents' ability to correctly identify electrocardiogram (ECG) findings and pair them to a corresponding cardiac diagnosis. Methods: Forty-six pediatric residents from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center were surveyed to evaluate their ability to interpret ECGs and factors affecting that ability. Included in the survey was a packet of 10 patient vignettes each accompanied by a 12-lead ECG. The primary outcome variable was the resident's score of correctly paired ECG findings with the appropriate cardiac diagnosis. One point was given for each pair correctly identified for a maximum of 10 points. Simple and multiple linear regression was used to estimate the magnitude and significance of any association between score of correct responses and resident year, completion of a pediatric cardiology rotation, self-rated ability to read ECGs, and training received in reading ECGs. Results : The mean number of correct ECG findings and cardiac diagnosis pairings out of 10 for the PGY 1 group was 4.1 ± 3, PGY 2 group 4.9 ± 2.9, PGY 3 group 6.6 ± 2, and the PGY 4 group 6.8 ± 1.7. In the unadjusted linear regression model, the PGY 3 group correctly identified 2.4 more pairings compared to the PGY 1 group (P =0.02). Those who completed a pediatric cardiology rotation correctly identified 2.5 more pairings compared to those who did not complete a rotation (P=0.001). Conclusions: ECG interpretation significantly improved from PGY 1 to PGY 3. Educational programs involving ECG interpretation should target those diagnoses with high clinical severity and average to poor resident knowledge.






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