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Risk factors for morbidity in infants undergoing tetralogy of fallot repair


Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, USA

Correspondence Address:
Alexander C Egbe
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy place, New York - 100 29, NY
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126539

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Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13-18

 

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Background: Primary repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) has low surgical mortality, but some patients still experience significant postoperative morbidity. Aim: To review our institutional experience with primary TOF repair, and identify predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Settings and Design: Medium-sized pediatric cardiology program. Retrospective study. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with TOF and pulmonic stenosis who underwent primary repair in infancy at our institution from January 2001 to December 2012. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative demographic and morphologic data were analyzed. ICU morbidity was defined as prolonged ICU stay (≥7 days), and/or prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation (≥48 h). Statistical Analysis Used: Multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: Ninety-seven patients underwent primary surgical repair during the study period. The median age was 4.9 months (1-9 months) and the median weight was 5.3 kg (3.1-9.8 kg). There was no early surgical mortality. Incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) and persistent complete heart block was 2 and 1%, respectively. The median length of ICU stay was 6 days (2-21 days) and median duration of mechanical ventilation was 19 h (0-136 h). By multiple regression analysis, age and weight were independent predictors of length of ICU stay, while surgical era was an independent predictor of duration of mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: Primary TOF repair is a safe procedure with low mortality and morbidity in a medium-sized program with outcomes comparable to national standards. Age and weight at the time of surgery remain significant predictors of morbidity.






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Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, USA

Correspondence Address:
Alexander C Egbe
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy place, New York - 100 29, NY
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126539

Rights and Permissions

Background: Primary repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) has low surgical mortality, but some patients still experience significant postoperative morbidity. Aim: To review our institutional experience with primary TOF repair, and identify predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Settings and Design: Medium-sized pediatric cardiology program. Retrospective study. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with TOF and pulmonic stenosis who underwent primary repair in infancy at our institution from January 2001 to December 2012. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative demographic and morphologic data were analyzed. ICU morbidity was defined as prolonged ICU stay (≥7 days), and/or prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation (≥48 h). Statistical Analysis Used: Multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: Ninety-seven patients underwent primary surgical repair during the study period. The median age was 4.9 months (1-9 months) and the median weight was 5.3 kg (3.1-9.8 kg). There was no early surgical mortality. Incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) and persistent complete heart block was 2 and 1%, respectively. The median length of ICU stay was 6 days (2-21 days) and median duration of mechanical ventilation was 19 h (0-136 h). By multiple regression analysis, age and weight were independent predictors of length of ICU stay, while surgical era was an independent predictor of duration of mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: Primary TOF repair is a safe procedure with low mortality and morbidity in a medium-sized program with outcomes comparable to national standards. Age and weight at the time of surgery remain significant predictors of morbidity.






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