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Anticipation and management of junctional ectopic tachycardia in postoperative cardiac surgery: Single center experience with high incidence


1 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin El Kom, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Salem Deraz
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin El Kom
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126543

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Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 19-24

 

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Background : Junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) often occurs in the early postoperative period following surgery for congenital heart diseases and may lead to hemodynamic compromise. Its exact etiology is unknown, however, longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aortic cross clamp (ACC) time, catecholamines, and hypomagnesemia are known risk factors. JET is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study of 194 consecutive children who underwent open heart surgery on CPB over 1 year period, patients was divided into three groups; JET, non-JET arrhythmia, and no arrhythmia groups. Information on patient's demographics (sex, age, and body weight), type of surgical interventions, duration of CPB and ACC, the use of inotropic support, duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and response to different therapeutic methods were collected. Results: JET was documented in 53 patients (27%) most commonly following tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair and was associated with longer CPB and ACC times (118 and 77 min, respectively) as compared to non-JET arrhythmia (93.9 and 55.3 min, respectively) and no arrhythmia groups (94.9 and 54.8 min, respectively). Patients with JET required more inotropic support and longer ICU stay as compared to other groups. Amiodarone was safe and effective in treatment of JET. Atrial electrocardiogram (ECG) and Lewis lead ECG were helpful tools in JET diagnosis. The mortality was 11.5% in JET patients. Conclusions: Incidence of JET was 27% possibly due to the large number of Fallot repair and Senning operation. Longer CPB and ACC times are risk factors for JET.






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1 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin El Kom, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Salem Deraz
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebin El Kom
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126543

Rights and Permissions

Background : Junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) often occurs in the early postoperative period following surgery for congenital heart diseases and may lead to hemodynamic compromise. Its exact etiology is unknown, however, longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aortic cross clamp (ACC) time, catecholamines, and hypomagnesemia are known risk factors. JET is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study of 194 consecutive children who underwent open heart surgery on CPB over 1 year period, patients was divided into three groups; JET, non-JET arrhythmia, and no arrhythmia groups. Information on patient's demographics (sex, age, and body weight), type of surgical interventions, duration of CPB and ACC, the use of inotropic support, duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and response to different therapeutic methods were collected. Results: JET was documented in 53 patients (27%) most commonly following tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair and was associated with longer CPB and ACC times (118 and 77 min, respectively) as compared to non-JET arrhythmia (93.9 and 55.3 min, respectively) and no arrhythmia groups (94.9 and 54.8 min, respectively). Patients with JET required more inotropic support and longer ICU stay as compared to other groups. Amiodarone was safe and effective in treatment of JET. Atrial electrocardiogram (ECG) and Lewis lead ECG were helpful tools in JET diagnosis. The mortality was 11.5% in JET patients. Conclusions: Incidence of JET was 27% possibly due to the large number of Fallot repair and Senning operation. Longer CPB and ACC times are risk factors for JET.






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