Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1942    
    Printed52    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded169    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

Percutaneous closure of patent ductus arteriosus in interrupted inferior caval vein through femoral vein approach


1 Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Cardiology Unit, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University and Cardiac Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2 Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Madrid, Spain; Volunteer Cardiologist, Cardiac Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence Address:
Endale Tefera
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Corner of Zambia and T. Abanefso Roads, P.o. Box 1768, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126560

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 55-57

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (711 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Percutaneous closure of the patent arterial duct in patients with interrupted inferior caval vein poses a technical challenge. A 12-year-old girl with a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and interrupted inferior caval vein is described in this report. The diagnosis of interrupted inferior caval vein and azygos continuation was made in the catheterization laboratory. A catheter was advanced and snared in the descending aorta. An exchange wire was advanced through the catheter and snared in the descending aorta. Then, an Amplatzer TorqVue 2 delivery sheath was advanced over the wire from the venous side and again snared in the descending aorta. An Amplatzer duct occluder (ADO) size 8/6 was advanced through the sheath while still holding the sheath with a snare. The device was opened. The sheath was then unsnared once the aortic disc was completely out. The sheath and the device were pulled back into the duct and the device was successfully implanted. The device was then released and it attained a stable position. An aortic angiogram was performed which showed complete occlusion.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




1 Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Cardiology Unit, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University and Cardiac Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2 Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Madrid, Spain; Volunteer Cardiologist, Cardiac Center, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence Address:
Endale Tefera
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, Corner of Zambia and T. Abanefso Roads, P.o. Box 1768, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.126560

Rights and Permissions

Percutaneous closure of the patent arterial duct in patients with interrupted inferior caval vein poses a technical challenge. A 12-year-old girl with a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and interrupted inferior caval vein is described in this report. The diagnosis of interrupted inferior caval vein and azygos continuation was made in the catheterization laboratory. A catheter was advanced and snared in the descending aorta. An exchange wire was advanced through the catheter and snared in the descending aorta. Then, an Amplatzer TorqVue 2 delivery sheath was advanced over the wire from the venous side and again snared in the descending aorta. An Amplatzer duct occluder (ADO) size 8/6 was advanced through the sheath while still holding the sheath with a snare. The device was opened. The sheath was then unsnared once the aortic disc was completely out. The sheath and the device were pulled back into the duct and the device was successfully implanted. The device was then released and it attained a stable position. An aortic angiogram was performed which showed complete occlusion.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article