Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE CONFERENCE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1650    
    Printed38    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded105    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome secondary to intrauterine rhabdomyoma necessitating single ventricle palliation


1 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Oklahoma University Children Hospital, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Children Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Arshid Mir
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Oklahoma University Children Hospital, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, 1200 Everett Drive, Suite NP 2350, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.140851

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 207-209

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,126 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Rhabdomyoma, a benign hamartomatous tumor of the cardiac embryonic myocyte, is the most common intrauterine cardiac tumor and accounts for 0.12% of prenatal fetal studies. Fetal cardiac rhabdomyomas increase in size during second and early third trimester and spontaneously regress postnatally. The clinical presentation is usually benign, however, compromise of the ventricular outflow tract leading to decreased cardiac output and fetal death have been reported. We present a case of large cardiac rhabdomyoma in a fetus that might have caused complete left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and development of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) necessitating postnatal single ventricle palliation therapy. The clinical course and outcomes of prenatally diagnosed cardiac rhabdomyoma are reviewed and theories of the development of hypoplastic left heart syndrome are explored.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE CONFERENCE
 




1 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Oklahoma University Children Hospital, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Children Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Arshid Mir
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Oklahoma University Children Hospital, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, 1200 Everett Drive, Suite NP 2350, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.140851

Rights and Permissions

Rhabdomyoma, a benign hamartomatous tumor of the cardiac embryonic myocyte, is the most common intrauterine cardiac tumor and accounts for 0.12% of prenatal fetal studies. Fetal cardiac rhabdomyomas increase in size during second and early third trimester and spontaneously regress postnatally. The clinical presentation is usually benign, however, compromise of the ventricular outflow tract leading to decreased cardiac output and fetal death have been reported. We present a case of large cardiac rhabdomyoma in a fetus that might have caused complete left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and development of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) necessitating postnatal single ventricle palliation therapy. The clinical course and outcomes of prenatally diagnosed cardiac rhabdomyoma are reviewed and theories of the development of hypoplastic left heart syndrome are explored.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article