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Teaching focused echocardiography for rheumatic heart disease screening


1 Department of Paediatrics, Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
2 Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Suva, Fiji
3 Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia
4 Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, United Kingdom
5 Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Daniel Engelman
General Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, 3052
Australia
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Source of Support: Funding for this project was supported by a grant from Cure Kids New Zealand. DE and ACS are both supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council/National Heart Foundation research fellowships. None of the funders played a role in the design of the study; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the paper for publication., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.157024

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Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 118-121

 

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Screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) requires workers skilled in echocardiography, which typically involves prolonged, specialized training. Task shifting echocardiographic screening to nonexpert health workers may be a solution in settings with limited human resources. An 8-week training program was designed to train health workers without any prior experience in focused echocardiography for RHD screening. Seven health workers participated. At the completion of training, the health workers performed unsupervised echocardiography on 16 volunteer children with known RHD status. A pediatric cardiologist assessed image quality. Participants provided qualitative feedback. The quality of echocardiograms were high at completion of training (55 of 56 were adequate for diagnosis) and all cases of RHD were identified. Feedback was strongly positive. Training health workers to perform focused echocardiography for RHD screening is feasible. After systematic testing for accuracy, this training program could be adapted in other settings seeking to expand echocardiographic capabilities.






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1 Department of Paediatrics, Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
2 Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Suva, Fiji
3 Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia
4 Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, United Kingdom
5 Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Daniel Engelman
General Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, 3052
Australia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Funding for this project was supported by a grant from Cure Kids New Zealand. DE and ACS are both supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council/National Heart Foundation research fellowships. None of the funders played a role in the design of the study; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the paper for publication., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.157024

Rights and Permissions

Screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) requires workers skilled in echocardiography, which typically involves prolonged, specialized training. Task shifting echocardiographic screening to nonexpert health workers may be a solution in settings with limited human resources. An 8-week training program was designed to train health workers without any prior experience in focused echocardiography for RHD screening. Seven health workers participated. At the completion of training, the health workers performed unsupervised echocardiography on 16 volunteer children with known RHD status. A pediatric cardiologist assessed image quality. Participants provided qualitative feedback. The quality of echocardiograms were high at completion of training (55 of 56 were adequate for diagnosis) and all cases of RHD were identified. Feedback was strongly positive. Training health workers to perform focused echocardiography for RHD screening is feasible. After systematic testing for accuracy, this training program could be adapted in other settings seeking to expand echocardiographic capabilities.






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