Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2751    
    Printed51    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded117    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Stent implantation of left main coronary artery stenosis in an infant: Effective long-term treatment?


Department for Pediatric Cardiology, University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Strümpellstr, Leipzig, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Christian Paech
Department for Pediatric Cardiology, University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Strümpellstr. 39, Leipzig - 04289
Germany
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.157035

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 147-149

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (629 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Coronary artery stenosis is a rare phenomenon in children. Coronary stent implantation is generally not considered a standard treatment option due to technical difficulties and potential complications in this group of patients. Nevertheless, several pediatric cases reporting successful implantation with acceptable short-term experiences have been described. The following case presents a successful stent implantation for left main coronary artery (LMCA) stenosis early after surgery for anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) at the age of 6 months. The excellent mid-term results and notably the procedure's potential as a long-term treatment in small children are highlighted. A 6-month-old infant underwent surgery for ALCAPA. Due to sudden postoperative deterioration, cardiac catheterization was performed. Coronary angiography revealed severe (90%) ostial LMCA stenosis. A PROMUS drug-eluting stent (Promus Element AL3.0 Χ 8 mm, Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts, USA) was implanted. The procedure was performed without complications. Antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel was initiated. Subsequently, cardiac function improved slowly. Cardiac catheterization 3 years 8 months after stent implantation showed no restenosis with a proximal LMCA diameter still at the 50 th percentile for age. Neither were signs of heart failure reported at the last follow-up at 7 years of age. Presupposing normal growth, the implanted stent would thus provide sufficient myocardial perfusion with a LMCA lumen at the 40 th percentile at the age of 16 years. In selected cases, coronary stent implantation may be an effective mid- to long-term treatment of coronary artery stenosis even in very young children.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




Department for Pediatric Cardiology, University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Strümpellstr, Leipzig, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Christian Paech
Department for Pediatric Cardiology, University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Strümpellstr. 39, Leipzig - 04289
Germany
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.157035

Rights and Permissions

Coronary artery stenosis is a rare phenomenon in children. Coronary stent implantation is generally not considered a standard treatment option due to technical difficulties and potential complications in this group of patients. Nevertheless, several pediatric cases reporting successful implantation with acceptable short-term experiences have been described. The following case presents a successful stent implantation for left main coronary artery (LMCA) stenosis early after surgery for anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) at the age of 6 months. The excellent mid-term results and notably the procedure's potential as a long-term treatment in small children are highlighted. A 6-month-old infant underwent surgery for ALCAPA. Due to sudden postoperative deterioration, cardiac catheterization was performed. Coronary angiography revealed severe (90%) ostial LMCA stenosis. A PROMUS drug-eluting stent (Promus Element AL3.0 Χ 8 mm, Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts, USA) was implanted. The procedure was performed without complications. Antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel was initiated. Subsequently, cardiac function improved slowly. Cardiac catheterization 3 years 8 months after stent implantation showed no restenosis with a proximal LMCA diameter still at the 50 th percentile for age. Neither were signs of heart failure reported at the last follow-up at 7 years of age. Presupposing normal growth, the implanted stent would thus provide sufficient myocardial perfusion with a LMCA lumen at the 40 th percentile at the age of 16 years. In selected cases, coronary stent implantation may be an effective mid- to long-term treatment of coronary artery stenosis even in very young children.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article