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A novel method of creation of a fenestration in nitinol occluder devices used in closure of hypertensive patent arterial ducts


Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Institute of Cardio Vascular Diseases, The Madras Medical Mission, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Kothandam Sivakumar
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Institute of Cardio Vascular Diseases, The Madras Medical Mission, 4a, Dr. J J Nagar, Mogappair, Chennai - 600 037, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.171399

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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 53-58

 

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Test occlusion with a balloon is done to predict operability of large hypertensive patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). If the fall in the pulmonary artery pressures is inadequate, a complete closure is not desired. To create a predictable premeasured fenestration in a nitinol occluder device used for closing hypertensive PDA. A large nitinol occluder device was punctured with an 18G needle to advance a 0.035½ stiff guide wire through the occluder before loading it into the delivery system. The occluder with the guidewire was then deployed across the PDA. A coronary guide catheter was later threaded through the guidewire into the fabric of the device, which was still held by the delivery cable. A coronary stent was deployed across the fenestration in the occluder to keep it patent. An 8-year-old boy with Down syndrome and hypertensive PDA was hemodynamically assessed. Even though there was a fall in the pulmonary vascular resistance index and pressures on test occlusion, the pulmonary artery pressures were labile with fluctuations. A customized fenestration was made in a 16 mm muscular ventricular septal defect occluder (MVSO) with a 4.5 mm bare-metal coronary stent. The pulmonary artery pressures remained at half of the aortic pressures after the procedure. This fenestration model precisely and predictably fenestrated a large occluder device used to close a hypertensive large PDA. Long-term patency of these fenestrations has to be assessed on the follow-up, and may be improved through larger fenestrations, systemic anticoagulation and use of covered stents.






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Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Institute of Cardio Vascular Diseases, The Madras Medical Mission, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Kothandam Sivakumar
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Institute of Cardio Vascular Diseases, The Madras Medical Mission, 4a, Dr. J J Nagar, Mogappair, Chennai - 600 037, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-2069.171399

Rights and Permissions

Test occlusion with a balloon is done to predict operability of large hypertensive patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). If the fall in the pulmonary artery pressures is inadequate, a complete closure is not desired. To create a predictable premeasured fenestration in a nitinol occluder device used for closing hypertensive PDA. A large nitinol occluder device was punctured with an 18G needle to advance a 0.035½ stiff guide wire through the occluder before loading it into the delivery system. The occluder with the guidewire was then deployed across the PDA. A coronary guide catheter was later threaded through the guidewire into the fabric of the device, which was still held by the delivery cable. A coronary stent was deployed across the fenestration in the occluder to keep it patent. An 8-year-old boy with Down syndrome and hypertensive PDA was hemodynamically assessed. Even though there was a fall in the pulmonary vascular resistance index and pressures on test occlusion, the pulmonary artery pressures were labile with fluctuations. A customized fenestration was made in a 16 mm muscular ventricular septal defect occluder (MVSO) with a 4.5 mm bare-metal coronary stent. The pulmonary artery pressures remained at half of the aortic pressures after the procedure. This fenestration model precisely and predictably fenestrated a large occluder device used to close a hypertensive large PDA. Long-term patency of these fenestrations has to be assessed on the follow-up, and may be improved through larger fenestrations, systemic anticoagulation and use of covered stents.






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