Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed211    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded14    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Intraocular pressure in children after congenital heart surgery: A single-center study


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
2 Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
3 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
4 Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pediatric Anesthesia, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Punkaj Gupta
Department of Pediatrics, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, One Children's Way, Slot 512-3, Little Rock, Arkansas
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_41_17

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 234-239

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (884 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Background: The impact of varied cardiac physiologies on intraocular pressure (IOP) among children undergoing heart operations is unknown. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the IOP among children with varying cardiovascular physiologies and varying hemodynamics after their heart operation. Setting and Design: This was a prospective, observational study. Materials and Methods: Patients ≤18 years undergoing congenital heart surgery were included in this study. IOP measurement was performed by Icare® tonometer between 3 and 14 days after heart operation. Statistical Analysis: Summary statistics were estimated for all demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data. Results: A total of 116 eyes from 58 children were included. The mean and standard deviation age was 28.4 (45.8) months. Single-ventricle anatomy was present in 26 patients (45%). Despite similar heart rate and blood pressure, the mean IOP among the patients with single-ventricle anatomy was significantly elevated as compared to patients with two-ventricle anatomy (18 mm Hg vs. 12 mm Hg, P < 0.001). There was no difference in IOP measurements based on the complexity of operation performed. We noted that patients undergoing surgical palliation with central shunt (21 mm Hg), Fontan operation (19 mm Hg), bidirectional Glenn operation (19 mm Hg), Norwood operation (19 mm Hg), or definitive repairs such as tetralogy of Fallot repair (17 mm Hg), and atrioventricular canal repair (19 mm Hg) were associated with the highest IOPs in the study cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IOPs vary with varying cardiovascular physiology after pediatric cardiac surgery.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Department of Ophthalmology, Jones Eye Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
2 Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
3 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA
4 Department of Anesthesia, Division of Pediatric Anesthesia, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

Correspondence Address:
Punkaj Gupta
Department of Pediatrics, Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, One Children's Way, Slot 512-3, Little Rock, Arkansas
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_41_17

Rights and Permissions

Background: The impact of varied cardiac physiologies on intraocular pressure (IOP) among children undergoing heart operations is unknown. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the IOP among children with varying cardiovascular physiologies and varying hemodynamics after their heart operation. Setting and Design: This was a prospective, observational study. Materials and Methods: Patients ≤18 years undergoing congenital heart surgery were included in this study. IOP measurement was performed by Icare® tonometer between 3 and 14 days after heart operation. Statistical Analysis: Summary statistics were estimated for all demographic, anthropometric, and clinical data. Results: A total of 116 eyes from 58 children were included. The mean and standard deviation age was 28.4 (45.8) months. Single-ventricle anatomy was present in 26 patients (45%). Despite similar heart rate and blood pressure, the mean IOP among the patients with single-ventricle anatomy was significantly elevated as compared to patients with two-ventricle anatomy (18 mm Hg vs. 12 mm Hg, P < 0.001). There was no difference in IOP measurements based on the complexity of operation performed. We noted that patients undergoing surgical palliation with central shunt (21 mm Hg), Fontan operation (19 mm Hg), bidirectional Glenn operation (19 mm Hg), Norwood operation (19 mm Hg), or definitive repairs such as tetralogy of Fallot repair (17 mm Hg), and atrioventricular canal repair (19 mm Hg) were associated with the highest IOPs in the study cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that IOPs vary with varying cardiovascular physiology after pediatric cardiac surgery.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article