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Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Ministry of Health, Belau National Hospital, Koror, Republic of Palau
2 Children's National Medical Center, Cardiology, Washington DC, USA
3 Telehealth Center, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, South Africa
4 Divisions of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
5 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
6 Green Lane Paediatic and Congenital Cardiology Department, Starship Children's Hospital; Department of Paediatrics, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Scott Dougherty
Department of Internal Medicine, Ministry of Health, Belau National Hospital, 40461 Main Street, Koror 96940
Republic of Palau
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_135_17

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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 68-78

 

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Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs.






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1 Department of Internal Medicine, Ministry of Health, Belau National Hospital, Koror, Republic of Palau
2 Children's National Medical Center, Cardiology, Washington DC, USA
3 Telehealth Center, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, South Africa
4 Divisions of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
5 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
6 Green Lane Paediatic and Congenital Cardiology Department, Starship Children's Hospital; Department of Paediatrics, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Scott Dougherty
Department of Internal Medicine, Ministry of Health, Belau National Hospital, 40461 Main Street, Koror 96940
Republic of Palau
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_135_17

Rights and Permissions

Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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