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Validation of the accuracy of handheld echocardiography for diagnosis of congenital heart disease


1 Sudan Heart Center; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
2 Pediatric Cardiology Fellow, Sudan Heart Center, Sudan Medical Specialization Board Sudan Medical Specialization Board, Khartoum, Sudan

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Sulafa Ali
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum
Sudan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_159_17

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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 250-254

 

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Background: Handheld echocardiography (HHE) has been increasingly used for rheumatic heart disease screening and in adult emergency room settings. Aims: This study aimed to validate the accuracy of HHE in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD). Settings and Design Methodology: This is a prospective study carried out at three pediatric cardiology outpatient clinics in Khartoum, Sudan. All patients with suspected CHD were evaluated by clinical examination followed by HHE, performed using a modified segmental approach. Then, a complete study was performed using a standard echocardiography machine. The results were then compared using appropriate statistical tools. Results: A total of eighty cases were included with the following diagnoses either in isolation or combination: ventricular septal defect (n = 23), atrial septal defect (n = 10), pulmonary stenosis (n = 7), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 7), patent ductus arteriosus (n = 6), atrioventricular septal defect (n = 6), transposition of the great arteries (n = 6), and other diagnoses (n = 15). Agreement between HHE and SE was excellent both for visualizing heart segments (κ =77%–100% with a mean of 92.9%) and for diagnosis of CHD (κ =66%–100% with a mean of 91.7%). The sensitivity of HHE was 69.2%–100% (mean = 90.2%) and specificity was 98.5%–100% (mean = 99.3%). Conclusion: This study supports extending the utility of HHE in children for screening of CHD in addition to its current role in rheumatic heart disease screening.






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1 Sudan Heart Center; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
2 Pediatric Cardiology Fellow, Sudan Heart Center, Sudan Medical Specialization Board Sudan Medical Specialization Board, Khartoum, Sudan

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Sulafa Ali
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Khartoum
Sudan
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_159_17

Rights and Permissions

Background: Handheld echocardiography (HHE) has been increasingly used for rheumatic heart disease screening and in adult emergency room settings. Aims: This study aimed to validate the accuracy of HHE in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD). Settings and Design Methodology: This is a prospective study carried out at three pediatric cardiology outpatient clinics in Khartoum, Sudan. All patients with suspected CHD were evaluated by clinical examination followed by HHE, performed using a modified segmental approach. Then, a complete study was performed using a standard echocardiography machine. The results were then compared using appropriate statistical tools. Results: A total of eighty cases were included with the following diagnoses either in isolation or combination: ventricular septal defect (n = 23), atrial septal defect (n = 10), pulmonary stenosis (n = 7), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 7), patent ductus arteriosus (n = 6), atrioventricular septal defect (n = 6), transposition of the great arteries (n = 6), and other diagnoses (n = 15). Agreement between HHE and SE was excellent both for visualizing heart segments (κ =77%–100% with a mean of 92.9%) and for diagnosis of CHD (κ =66%–100% with a mean of 91.7%). The sensitivity of HHE was 69.2%–100% (mean = 90.2%) and specificity was 98.5%–100% (mean = 99.3%). Conclusion: This study supports extending the utility of HHE in children for screening of CHD in addition to its current role in rheumatic heart disease screening.






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