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Complicated coarctation repair: The importance of three-dimensional cross-sectional imaging in late postoperative assessment


1 Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebrón, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebrón, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK
2 Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK
3 Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital; National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Inga Voges
Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_62_18

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Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 178-181

 

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Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) represents 5%–8% of congenital heart disease patients and is one of the most common causes of neonatal surgical intervention. These patients require close lifelong follow-up due to frequent long-term complications. Although transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line technique for its diagnosis and follow-up, cross-sectional imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) gives excellent anatomical and functional information, especially in complex CoA. We present the case of a 17-year-old patient who underwent complicated neonatal CoA repair and demonstrate how CMR and thorough operative records helped to define the exact anatomy of repair many years after surgery. Furthermore, we conclude that keeping surgical drawings in the patient records can be of great importance, especially in complicated cases.






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1 Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebrón, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebrón, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK
2 Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK
3 Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital; National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Inga Voges
Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP
UK
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_62_18

Rights and Permissions

Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) represents 5%–8% of congenital heart disease patients and is one of the most common causes of neonatal surgical intervention. These patients require close lifelong follow-up due to frequent long-term complications. Although transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line technique for its diagnosis and follow-up, cross-sectional imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) gives excellent anatomical and functional information, especially in complex CoA. We present the case of a 17-year-old patient who underwent complicated neonatal CoA repair and demonstrate how CMR and thorough operative records helped to define the exact anatomy of repair many years after surgery. Furthermore, we conclude that keeping surgical drawings in the patient records can be of great importance, especially in complicated cases.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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