Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed643    
    Printed30    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded25    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Umbilical artery catheter, aortic dissection, carotid cannulation, and pseudoaneurysm in a neonate: A tale of propagating pathology


1 Department of Pediatric Intensive Care, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
2 Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
3 Department of Pediatric Interventional Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
4 Department of Congenital Heart Disease Surgery, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
5 Department of Aortic and Vascular Surgery, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
6 Department of Pediatric Intensive Care; Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Justin Wang
Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_67_19

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 87-90

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,972 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Arterial dissections are uncommon in neonates. Complications include thrombosis, bleeding, dissection, aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm. We report an unusual case of multisite pathology (dissection and pseudoaneurysm) following common vascular interventions. A term neonate with antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart block secondary to maternal lupus deteriorated clinically at 5 days of life. He was found to have an abdominal aortic thrombus secondary to abdominal aortic dissection, following umbilical arterial catheter placement. Attempted percutaneous treatment was complicated by dissection of the left common carotid artery and formation of a large pseudoaneurysm. Neonatal lupus is associated with weakened vessel wall which may be vulnerable to injury from line placement and endovascular interventions. Various options are available to manage arterial dissection, thrombus, and pseudoaneurysm, but consequences of these options need to be carefully weighed to minimize further complications.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




1 Department of Pediatric Intensive Care, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
2 Department of Radiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
3 Department of Pediatric Interventional Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
4 Department of Congenital Heart Disease Surgery, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
5 Department of Aortic and Vascular Surgery, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom
6 Department of Pediatric Intensive Care; Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Justin Wang
Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_67_19

Rights and Permissions

Arterial dissections are uncommon in neonates. Complications include thrombosis, bleeding, dissection, aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm. We report an unusual case of multisite pathology (dissection and pseudoaneurysm) following common vascular interventions. A term neonate with antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart block secondary to maternal lupus deteriorated clinically at 5 days of life. He was found to have an abdominal aortic thrombus secondary to abdominal aortic dissection, following umbilical arterial catheter placement. Attempted percutaneous treatment was complicated by dissection of the left common carotid artery and formation of a large pseudoaneurysm. Neonatal lupus is associated with weakened vessel wall which may be vulnerable to injury from line placement and endovascular interventions. Various options are available to manage arterial dissection, thrombus, and pseudoaneurysm, but consequences of these options need to be carefully weighed to minimize further complications.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article