Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed137    
    Printed3    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded22    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Why humans should not eat broom straws: Pericarditis and endocarditis


1 Department of Pediatrics, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC, USA
2 Vidant Medical Center, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Greenville, NC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. William Edward Novotny
Department of Pediatrics, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC 27834
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_194_19

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 144-146

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (712 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
A broom straw was ingested and penetrated the esophageal wall, the pericardial space and its tip became lodged in the coronary sinus. Bacterial pericarditis and then fungal endocarditis ensued but were temporally separated by an asymptomatic 6-month period. On transthoracic echocardiography, the straw was mistakenly identified to be a “prominent Thebesian valve.” This child survived both life-threatening infections. The occurrence of infections caused by unusual organisms in the setting of immunocompetence highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for the presence of a causative foreign body.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




1 Department of Pediatrics, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC, USA
2 Vidant Medical Center, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Greenville, NC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. William Edward Novotny
Department of Pediatrics, East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine, Greenville, NC 27834
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_194_19

Rights and Permissions

A broom straw was ingested and penetrated the esophageal wall, the pericardial space and its tip became lodged in the coronary sinus. Bacterial pericarditis and then fungal endocarditis ensued but were temporally separated by an asymptomatic 6-month period. On transthoracic echocardiography, the straw was mistakenly identified to be a “prominent Thebesian valve.” This child survived both life-threatening infections. The occurrence of infections caused by unusual organisms in the setting of immunocompetence highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for the presence of a causative foreign body.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article