Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed345    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded43    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Surgical outcomes of absent pulmonary valve syndrome: An institutional experience


Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Institut Jantung Negara, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sivakumar Sivalingam
National Heart Institute, 145 Jalan Tun Razak, 50400 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Malaysia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_111_19

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 212-219

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,043 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Background: Absent pulmonary valve syndrome (APVS) is a variant of tetralogy of Fallot characterized by aneurysmal pulmonary arteries, which compresses the tracheobronchial tree, leading to respiratory symptoms. We report the mid-term outcomes of surgical correction of patients with APVS. Subject and Methods: A total of 27 patients underwent surgery between 2001 and 2015, and they were followed up for a mean period of 6.4 ± 4.1 years. Out of the 27 patients, 14 (51.9%) were infants. The median age at repair was 9.8 months. Preoperative intubation was required in six patients (22.2%), and 11 patients (40.7%) had symptoms of respiratory distress. The pulmonary valve was replaced with a valved conduit in 15 patients (55.6%), monocusp valve in 6 patients (22.2%), and a transannular patch in 6 patients (22.2%). Reduction pulmonary arterioplasty was done in all patients. Results: The overall 10-year survival was 82.1%. There was 81.1% overall freedom from re-intervention at 10 years. No statistically significant difference was found in 10-year survival (P = 0.464) and reoperation rates (P = 0.129) between valved conduit, monocusp, or transannular patch techniques. Older children had statistically significantly longer survival (P = 0.039) and freedom from re-intervention (P = 0.016) compared to infants. Patients without respiratory complications had 100% 10-year survival and 93.3% freedom from reoperation at 10 years compared to 55.6% and 60.1%, respectively, for patients with respiratory complications. Conclusion: There has been improvement in surgical results for APVS over the years. However, it still remains a challenge to manage infants and patients with persistent respiratory problems.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Institut Jantung Negara, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sivakumar Sivalingam
National Heart Institute, 145 Jalan Tun Razak, 50400 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Malaysia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_111_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Absent pulmonary valve syndrome (APVS) is a variant of tetralogy of Fallot characterized by aneurysmal pulmonary arteries, which compresses the tracheobronchial tree, leading to respiratory symptoms. We report the mid-term outcomes of surgical correction of patients with APVS. Subject and Methods: A total of 27 patients underwent surgery between 2001 and 2015, and they were followed up for a mean period of 6.4 ± 4.1 years. Out of the 27 patients, 14 (51.9%) were infants. The median age at repair was 9.8 months. Preoperative intubation was required in six patients (22.2%), and 11 patients (40.7%) had symptoms of respiratory distress. The pulmonary valve was replaced with a valved conduit in 15 patients (55.6%), monocusp valve in 6 patients (22.2%), and a transannular patch in 6 patients (22.2%). Reduction pulmonary arterioplasty was done in all patients. Results: The overall 10-year survival was 82.1%. There was 81.1% overall freedom from re-intervention at 10 years. No statistically significant difference was found in 10-year survival (P = 0.464) and reoperation rates (P = 0.129) between valved conduit, monocusp, or transannular patch techniques. Older children had statistically significantly longer survival (P = 0.039) and freedom from re-intervention (P = 0.016) compared to infants. Patients without respiratory complications had 100% 10-year survival and 93.3% freedom from reoperation at 10 years compared to 55.6% and 60.1%, respectively, for patients with respiratory complications. Conclusion: There has been improvement in surgical results for APVS over the years. However, it still remains a challenge to manage infants and patients with persistent respiratory problems.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article