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Early experience with pediatric cardiac transplantation in a limited resource setting


1 Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Division of Advanced Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplant and Pulmonary Hypertension, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
3 Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
4 Division of Intensive Care, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
5 Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
6 Division of Anesthesiology, Fortis Hospita, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
7 Division of Infectious Diseases, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
8 Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Swati Garekar
Room 106, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Fortis Hospital, Mulund, Mumbai - 400 078, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_105_19

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Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 220-226

 

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Background: Pediatric heart transplantation is a now a well-established and standard treatment option for end stage heart failure for various conditions in children. Due to logistic issues, it is not an option for in most pediatric cardiac centres in the third world. Aim: We sought to describe our early experience in the current era in India. Methods: This is a short term retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent heart transplantation at our centre. Mean/Median with standard deviation /range was used to present data. Results: Twenty patients underwent orthotopic heart transplant between January 2016 and June 2019. The median age at transplant was 12.4years (range 3.3 to 17.3 years). The median weight was 23.2kg (range 10-80kg). The mean donor/recipient weight ratio was 1.62± 0.84. The mean ICU stay was 12.1days. The mean follow up post transplant was 2.03± 0.97years (range 10 days-3.57years). The 1 month and the 1 year survival was 100%. Biopsies were positive for significant rejection in 7 patients (35%). At the time of last follow-up, 3 patients (15%) had expired. The major post transplant morbidities were mechanical circulatory support (n=3), hypertension with seizure complex (n=3), post transplant lympho-proliferative disorder (n=1), pseudocyst of pancreas (n=1), coronary allograft vasculopathy (n=3) and systemic hypertension (n=7). All surviving patients (n=17) were asymptomatic at last follow up. Conclusion: The results suggest acceptable short term outcomes in Indian pediatric patients can be achieved after heart transplantation in the current era. Significant rejection episodes and coronary allograft vasculopathy need careful follow up.






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1 Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Division of Advanced Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplant and Pulmonary Hypertension, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
3 Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
4 Division of Intensive Care, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
5 Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
6 Division of Anesthesiology, Fortis Hospita, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
7 Division of Infectious Diseases, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
8 Division of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Swati Garekar
Room 106, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Fortis Hospital, Mulund, Mumbai - 400 078, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_105_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Pediatric heart transplantation is a now a well-established and standard treatment option for end stage heart failure for various conditions in children. Due to logistic issues, it is not an option for in most pediatric cardiac centres in the third world. Aim: We sought to describe our early experience in the current era in India. Methods: This is a short term retrospective chart review of pediatric patients who underwent heart transplantation at our centre. Mean/Median with standard deviation /range was used to present data. Results: Twenty patients underwent orthotopic heart transplant between January 2016 and June 2019. The median age at transplant was 12.4years (range 3.3 to 17.3 years). The median weight was 23.2kg (range 10-80kg). The mean donor/recipient weight ratio was 1.62± 0.84. The mean ICU stay was 12.1days. The mean follow up post transplant was 2.03± 0.97years (range 10 days-3.57years). The 1 month and the 1 year survival was 100%. Biopsies were positive for significant rejection in 7 patients (35%). At the time of last follow-up, 3 patients (15%) had expired. The major post transplant morbidities were mechanical circulatory support (n=3), hypertension with seizure complex (n=3), post transplant lympho-proliferative disorder (n=1), pseudocyst of pancreas (n=1), coronary allograft vasculopathy (n=3) and systemic hypertension (n=7). All surviving patients (n=17) were asymptomatic at last follow up. Conclusion: The results suggest acceptable short term outcomes in Indian pediatric patients can be achieved after heart transplantation in the current era. Significant rejection episodes and coronary allograft vasculopathy need careful follow up.






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