Ann Pediatr Card Close
 

Figure 1: The transthoracic echocardiographic findings from first patient (a and b) and second patient (c and d). In both, with sinusal origin of pulmonary arteries, the pulmonary orifice is widely patent during diastole (a and c) but obstructed (yellow arrow) during systole (b and d) by a truncal valvar leaflet. Note the large subtruncal interventricular communication (*). CAT: common arterial trunk; LV: Left ventricle; PA: pulmonary arterial segment; RV: Right ventricle. Note that the echo images of the first patient are published as Figure 6 in our previous publication.[4]

Figure 1: The transthoracic echocardiographic findings from   first patient (a and b) and second patient (c and d). In both, with sinusal origin of pulmonary arteries, the pulmonary orifice is widely patent during diastole (a and c) but obstructed (yellow arrow) during systole (b and d) by a truncal valvar leaflet. Note the large subtruncal interventricular communication (*). CAT: common arterial trunk; LV: Left ventricle; PA: pulmonary arterial segment; RV: Right ventricle. Note that the echo images of the   first patient are published as Figure 6 in our previous publication.<sup>[4]</sup>