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Particle embolization of systemic-to-pulmonary collateral artery networks in congenital heart disease: Technique and special considerations


1 University of Mississippi Medical Center, School of Medicine; Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Batson Children's Hospital, Jackson, Mississippi, USA
2 University of Mississippi Medical Center, School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sarosh P Batlivala
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 2500 N. State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_93_17

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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 181-186

 

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Systemic-to-pulmonary artery collateral networks commonly develop in patients with single-ventricle physiology and chronic hypoxemia. Although these networks augment pulmonary blood flow, much of the flow is ineffective and contributes to cardiac volume loading. This volume loading can have detrimental effects, especially for single-ventricle patients. Some data suggest that occluding collaterals may improve outcomes after subsequent operations, especially when the volume of collateral flow is significant. Traditional practice has been to coil occlude the feeding vessel. We perform particle embolization of these collateral networks for two primary reasons. First, access to the feeding vessel is not blocked as collaterals may redevelop. Second, particles occlude the most distal connections. Thus, embolization with particles should be considered as an alternative to coil occluding the proximal feeding vessel.






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1 University of Mississippi Medical Center, School of Medicine; Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Batson Children's Hospital, Jackson, Mississippi, USA
2 University of Mississippi Medical Center, School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sarosh P Batlivala
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 2500 N. State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/apc.APC_93_17

Rights and Permissions

Systemic-to-pulmonary artery collateral networks commonly develop in patients with single-ventricle physiology and chronic hypoxemia. Although these networks augment pulmonary blood flow, much of the flow is ineffective and contributes to cardiac volume loading. This volume loading can have detrimental effects, especially for single-ventricle patients. Some data suggest that occluding collaterals may improve outcomes after subsequent operations, especially when the volume of collateral flow is significant. Traditional practice has been to coil occlude the feeding vessel. We perform particle embolization of these collateral networks for two primary reasons. First, access to the feeding vessel is not blocked as collaterals may redevelop. Second, particles occlude the most distal connections. Thus, embolization with particles should be considered as an alternative to coil occluding the proximal feeding vessel.






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